The White Horse Harness Club Rules vary slightly from the BHDTA Rules.
Download  Download WHHC Rules

Safety
Driving Trials may not be very high on the list of dangerous activities, but, nevertheless, there is always scope for accidents to happen when a lot of people and horses are gathered together in a confined space.

Accidents are usually the result of someone failing to observe the simple and sensible safety rules that we should all abide by. The following is a summary of some of the more important rules that everyone should observe at all times:-

  • From 1st January 2016 All on a carriage will be required to wear back protectors whilst competing; for all three phases of indoor driving and for the marathon/obstacle section of all outdoor competitions.
  • Check your harness before every event to ensure it is sound and unlikely to break. Always get your harness and vehicle properly adjusted before corning to the event.
  • The traces should always be secured before and undone after, the breeching and any other connections.
  • Never leave a horse or pony harnessed to a vehicle without either a driver in control of the reins or a groom holding the bridle.
  • Never tie up a horse or pony while harnessed to a vehicle.
  • Never remove the reins or any part of the bridle of any horse or pony while it is harnessed to a vehicle. Whereas a loose horse running free in a crowded horsebox park may be something of a hazard, one racing around with a cart behind it is positively lethal.
  • A competent driver must be on the box and in full control of the reins before anyone else gets on board and until everyone else has got off the vehicle.
  • Do not put your horse to until you are ready to drive and take it out as soon as you have finished driving.
  • Always proceed at a walk in the horsebox park and any other crowded areas.
  • Always remember that a horse or pony which has limited experience of coming to events is likely to get excited, it is not safe to assume it will behave as predictably. Try to pick a quiet corner of the horsebox park if your animal is inexperienced.
  • If you have the misfortune to get tipped out during the competition concentrate on keeping a hold on the reins: so long as you have them in your hands, you have some chance of regaining control.
  • Never strap small children into a vehicle: you may think it will stop them falling out but if the driver gets tipped out, falling out will be the least of their problems!